OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SERVICES and CONSULTANCY
workplace and medical assessments to protect employees and support businesses
     
 

NEWS....

Click on the links below to read the latest topic news.
 
2. Ebola - Could it affect your staff?
 
New law on drugs and driving. Are you prepared?
 
The new law on drugs and driving came into force on the 2nd March 2015. Police are entitled to request a saliva sample if they have any suspicion. The new drug limits are as follows:-
 
 
Illicit drugs:
 
1. Benzoylecgonine, 50 µg/L
2. Cocaine, 10 µg/L
3. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (cannabis and cannabinol), 2 µg/L
4. Ketamine, 20 µg/L
5. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 1 µg/L
6. Methylenedioxymethaphetamine (MDMA - ecstasy), 10 µg/L
7. Methylamphetamine, 10 µg/L
8. 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM - heroin and diamorphine), 5µg/L
 
 
General prescription drugs:
 
1. Clonazepam, 50 µg/L
2. Diazepam, 550 µg/L
3. Flunitrazepam, 300 µg/L
4. Lorazepam, 100 µg/L
5. Methadone, 500 µg/L
6. Morphine, 80 µg/L
7. Oxazepam, 300 µg/L
8. Temazepam, 1000 µg/L
 
If the saliva test is positive a blood sample can be taken for laboratory testing. If the laboratory test result is positive the driver can raise a 'medical defence'. Evidence of taking drugs for medical reasons is then considered.
 
Additionally to the drug limits stated above a driver can be unfit due to other reasons and driving unfit is not legal.
 
 
 
Ebola - Could it affect your staff?

Currently the virus causing Ebola is common in West Africa. People coming or returning from Guinea, Sierra Leone or Liberia might have caught the infection there and brought it with them to the UK. It is important to be aware of the risk and most importantly not getting paranoid. Here are some facts helping you to conduct a proper risk assessment.

  • The Ebola virus can only be transmitted by direct contact with blood or body fluids of an infected person. The virus is not airborne like the common flu.
  • Ebola is not infective before fever arrives.
  • The time between getting the virus and developing the first symptoms can vary from 2 to 21 days.
  • The symptoms can be flu like (headache, joint and muscle ache, weakness, sore throat) and result in fever above 38 degree Celsius.
  • The symptoms usually start very suddenly.
  • If a person develops symptoms and might be infected they should call 111 and follow the instructions provided.
  • Seeking medical help and compliance with medical advice is important as the symptoms can be very severe and result in death. At the moment the likelihood to survive is about 50% and with specialist medical support much better.
 

If members of your staff may have volunteered in West Africa it is recommended to assess their risk to carry the infection.

  • Returned from West Africa and no contact with Ebola cases. The person has no symptoms. – No risk.
  • Returned from West Africa and had contact to Ebola cases. Full protective gear was worn at all times during contact and the person has no symptoms. – Self-monitoring for 21 days, no travel restrictions.
  • Returned from West Africa and had unprotected contact with Ebola cases. The person has no symptoms. – Travel restriction, they need to stay in daily contact with Public Health England, consider working from home.


RIDDOR

Riddor - Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013

The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations better known as RIDDOR has now been replaced by new RIDDOR Regulations. The 2013 regulations came into force on the 1st October 2013 and have significant differences to the previous regulations.

According to the new regulations specified injuries and reportable diseases as well as illness following exposure to biological agents or carcinogen or mutagen substances and dangerous occurrences need to be reported within 10 to 15 days. If the link to work exposure or the extent of the health problem has not been able to be established no precautionary reporting is required but should be done as soon as the details become available. It is the employee's duty to provide their employer with a written diagnosis from a doctor. Then the duty of reporting rests with the employer. At the same time employers need to investigate accidents at work and near misses. Employees who have concerns about their accident not having been reported correctly can raise concerns with the Health and Safety Executive HSE. 


What is reportable under RIDDOR?


There is a list of specified injuries as follows:

  • Fractures of bones, except fingers, thumbs and toes
  • Amputation of finger, thumb, hand, arm, toe, foot or leg
  • Injury with permanent loss of vision or permanent reduction to one or both eyes
  • Crush injuries to head or torso
  • Burns of more than 10% of the body surface
  • Scalping requiring hospital treatment
  • Loss of consciousness due to head injury or lack of oxygen
  • Injury due to working in enclosed spaces leading to low body temperature, high body temperature or requiring resuscitation or hospital treatment for more than 24 hours


Reportable diseases are as follows:

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome if due to use of percussion or vibrating tools
  • Cramps of the hand or forearm if due to prolonged periods of repetitive movements of the fingers, hand or arm
  • Occupational Dermatitis if due to exposure to skin sensitizer or irritant
  • Hand-Arm-Vibration Syndrome if due to regular use of percussion or vibrating tools or transmitted vibration
  • Occupational Asthma if due to exposure to respiratory sensitizer
  • Tendonitis or Synovitis of the hand or forearm if due to physical demand and frequent, repetitive movement

As the reporting requires diagnosis by a physician and establishing if there is a link to work exposure, Occupational Health Physicians are ideally placed to advise on injuries and diseases being reportable under RIDDOR or not.


 
Would you like to have a look at our building and consulting rooms!


Follow BusinessHealthC on Twitter

Audit of Occupational Health reports 2016
The audit shows over 100% of reports having fully complied with reporting standards.
 
Audit of Occupational Health reports 2015
2015 shows over 90% of reports having fully complied with reporting standards.

Audit of Occupational Health reports 2014

The audit shows over 99% of reports having fully complied with reporting standards. 
Audit of Occupational Health reports 2013
2013 shows over 98% of reports having fully complied with reports standards.
Read more
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2016
Occupational Health Practitioners scored over 90% excellent in professional manners, medical and workplace knowledge and friendliness  Read more 
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2015
The feedback demonstrates high standards can be maintained over several years  Read more 
 

Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2014
Another great year of high customer satisfaction read more
 
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2013 
 
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2012 
 
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2011 
 
 
Customer Satisfaction Survey - Occupational Health - 2010 
 
 Good health is good business

  © Business and Health Consultancy - Occupational Health Services and Consultancy


last update 21.09.2017